Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology Joins Quantum Foundry at UCSB

2020-08-16
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Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology Joins Quantum Foundry at UCSB

Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology is pleased to announce they have joined the Quantum Foundry at the University of California Santa Barbara to further develop their Quantum technology solutions.

The Quantum Foundry at UC Santa Barbara is a next generation materials foundry that develops materials and interfaces hosting the coherent quantum states needed to power the coming age of quantum-based electronics. The mission of the Foundry is to develop materials hosting unprecedented quantum coherence, train the next generation quantum workforce, and to partner with industry to accelerate the development of quantum technologies.

Oxford Instruments is proud to be one of the industry partners at the UCSB Quantum Foundry, along with other industry leaders in the Quantum technology ecosystem.

Dr Ravi Sundaram, Head of Strategic R&D Markets, Oxford Instruments, commented “Oxford Instruments is delighted to be part of such a strong consortium at UCSB and to support the development of robust Quantum device fabrication processes for applications in computing, communications and sensing. We are committed to providing market leading quantum technology solutions to our customers and partnering with the Quantum Foundry will ensure we continue to be at the forefront of this developing technology.”

Dr Tal Margalith, Executive Director of Technology and Industrial Liaison, UCSB Quantum Foundry, said “We are thrilled to have Oxford Instruments on board. Their cutting edge, robust processing solutions tailored for quantum technology device fabrication will help us ensure that there’s an executable roadmap from academic discovery to commercial applications.”

Oxford Instruments continues to develop and support market-leading nano-fabrication solutions vital to the manufacture of several quantum device  platforms including superconducting qubits (ALD, Plasma etch), Diamond NV Centres (Plasma etch, Hard mask deposition), and integrated photonics-based qubits (waveguide etch, single photon detector layers etc.).

 

Read the original article on Oxford Instruments.

 

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